Pedestrian Fencing

Pedestrian fencing, or guard rail, may be used on the side of a road or within the median to restrict pedestrian access to the carriageway, reducing conflict between motorised vehicles and pedestrians.

Fencing is often used to direct pedestrians to a preferred formal crossing point and to discourage pedestrians from making dangerous crossing movements where visibility may be limited.

Innovative solutions can be achieved through good street design using street furniture, planting and public art to guide and direct pedestrian movements. Designs must consider the needs of vulnerable road users and the mobility impaired.

  • Helps to guide pedestrians to formal crossing points.
  • Can help to prevent unwanted pedestrian crossing movements.
  • Physically prevents pedestrian access to the carriageway.
  • Can help to prevent motorists from parking on the footpath.
  • Provides useful guidance for visually impaired pedestrians.
  • It is important to ensure that pedestrian fencing does not obstruct the drivers’ view of pedestrians on the footpath, or those about to cross the road.
  • The fence height, placement and construction material should be designed/selected to minimise any potential sight obstruction between vehicles and pedestrians about to cross the road.
  • Consideration should be given to the design of the fencing to ensure that the risk to errant vehicles is limited upon impact.
  • When used at staged or staggered crossings on pedestrian refuges, fences should be aligned so that pedestrians walk along the refuge in the opposite direction to the flow of traffic they are about to cross, and face oncoming traffic as they are about to leave the median.
  • Consideration should be given to improving accessibility for the mobility impaired. This may include design features such as paved footpaths with sufficient width to accommodate wheelchairs, dropped kerbs at pedestrian crossing points and tactile paving.

Benefits

  • Helps to guide pedestrians to formal crossing points.
  • Can help to prevent unwanted pedestrian crossing movements.
  • Physically prevents pedestrian access to the carriageway.
  • Can help to prevent motorists from parking on the footpath.
  • Provides useful guidance for visually impaired pedestrians.

Implementation issues

  • It is important to ensure that pedestrian fencing does not obstruct the drivers’ view of pedestrians on the footpath, or those about to cross the road.
  • The fence height, placement and construction material should be designed/selected to minimise any potential sight obstruction between vehicles and pedestrians about to cross the road.
  • Consideration should be given to the design of the fencing to ensure that the risk to errant vehicles is limited upon impact.
  • When used at staged or staggered crossings on pedestrian refuges, fences should be aligned so that pedestrians walk along the refuge in the opposite direction to the flow of traffic they are about to cross, and face oncoming traffic as they are about to leave the median.
  • Consideration should be given to improving accessibility for the mobility impaired. This may include design features such as paved footpaths with sufficient width to accommodate wheelchairs, dropped kerbs at pedestrian crossing points and tactile paving.

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Costs
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Treatment life
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Effectiveness
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